• Instructor twirls out of college after 50 years of educating
    Teaching

    Instructor twirls out of college after 50 years of educating

    A retiring Michigan instructor obtained a standing ovation at a Grand Rapids highschool on her final day of lessons, an emotional second that has since gone viral on TikTok.

    Video of English instructor Sheridan Steelman’s celebratory send-off has amassed over 6 million views and 1.2 million likes because it was posted on June 1.

    The viral footage, a mixture of two movies, options Steelman being greeted with cheers and applause from college students and academics alike, who type two lengthy traces alongside Northview Excessive Faculty’s first ground, resulting in the entrance doorways. Steelman is seen reacting in shock, wiping away tears, as Northview Principal Mark Thomas leads her towards the group. At one level, she gives the group a twirl, prompting smiles from the scholars.

    Katherine Steelman, one among Steelman’s six kids, shared the TikTok on her personal account.

    “My mother has taught at this highschool for 50 years,” she wrote within the caption. “She was 22 when she began as an English instructor. At present was her final day. The whole faculty despatched her off as she left the constructing one final time 🥺”

    Instructor twirls out of college after 50 years of educating

    Sheridan Steelman, a highschool English instructor, obtained a standing ovation from workers and college students on her final day of college. Steelman retired from educating this yr after 50 years at Northview Excessive Faculty in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

    Derek Brooks

    Thomas, who has identified Steelman for the final 24 years, since he himself began at Northview, was the mastermind behind the shock and stated he was “honored” when she requested him prematurely to stroll together with her on June 1, her final day at work.

    “In fascinated by it, I actually could not do justice to it,” he advised “Good Morning America.” “So I went round and acquired ahold of another academics and requested them and I sort of put this collectively and we have been working collectively to get a bunch of scholars and academics within the hallways, creating that tunnel, and he or she was not conscious of it.”

    Thomas described Steelman as “a tremendous educator.”

    “Her fiftieth yr was pretty much as good as or higher than the earlier 49,” the principal stated. “She by no means mailed it in a day in her life as an educator.”

    “I do not know if I’ve ever seen an educator simply modify and adapt to serve their college students over time, so as simply to proceed to advertise studying,” he added. “Some individuals can, in all phases of life, replicate what they’ve accomplished and do this over time. Properly, she always opinions her practices and always takes suggestions from her college students, and always appears at new improvements and greatest practices and he or she implements these in her classroom.”

    He recalled an instance from “most likely seven or eight years” earlier, when Steelman did away together with her instructor’s desk.

    “I am higher after I can sit with my college students and I can have interaction within the conversations and do the writing and do work with them,” he remembered her saying.

    Steelman advised “GMA” she completely cherished the job she’d held for the final 5 a long time. The choice to retire was one she thought by way of purposefully.

    PHOTO: Sheridan Steelman retired this year after 50 years as an English teacher at Northview High School in Grand Rapids, Mich. Steelman taught French in the past, but has mostly taught AP English Literature and AP English Language for the last decade.

    Sheridan Steelman retired this yr after 50 years as an English instructor at Northview Excessive Faculty in Grand Rapids, Mich. Steelman additionally taught French up to now however for the final decade, has principally taught AP English Literature and AP English Language lessons.

    Katherine Steelman

    “I assumed it might be actually cool to have the ability to go to 50 years however I did not need to do it until I used to be nonetheless actually having enjoyable and having fun with myself and was in good well being and nonetheless studying so much,” Steelman, 72, stated.

    “I really feel like I might have gone so much longer,” she continued. “However I additionally really feel prefer it’s time and though they are saying, ‘Properly, have been you prepared?’ No, but it surely’s time. It is also time for these youthful academics to maneuver up into management positions as division chief and curriculum instructor chief within the district.”

    Steelman additionally mirrored on the influence of the pandemic on her profession, saying that whereas some struggled with educating, she felt “very blessed” by the expertise.

    “Instructing modified a lot. We needed to learn to train on-line. We acquired a brand new studying administration system … and I used to be doing, principally, every day movies in order that college students would have the identical lesson in the event that they have been dwelling as they might have at college,” she stated. “I realized so much and so I assumed that was most likely actually good for me, and I suppose that is me in a nutshell. I simply have this insatiable thirst for information and studying and making an attempt to maintain up with all the brand new issues as a result of schooling does change fairly shortly.”

    Requested what recommendation she would give to youthful academics arising within the discipline, Steelman — who has taught each highschool English and French and, for the final decade, has centered on AP English Literature and AP English Language — emphasised the significance of enjoyable.

    “Attempt to just remember to have a stability and that you just’re caring for your self. But in addition, while you’re there within the classroom, simply have enjoyable, be your self and revel in all these moments, as a result of that is what the children bear in mind,” she stated. “They bear in mind how they have been handled as college students and so they keep in mind that relationship that you just had with them. They bear in mind the humorous stuff you talked about at school.”

    PHOTO: In addition to being a teacher, Steelman is also a mom to six children. Her kids, five of whom are pictured here with her, teamed up to coordinate a community celebration in honor of their mom at Northview High School.

    Along with being a instructor, Steelman can also be a mother to 6 kids. Her youngsters, 5 of whom are pictured right here together with her, teamed as much as coordinate a group celebration in honor of their mother at Northview Excessive Faculty.

    Stephanie Steelman

    Steelman stated each the send-off and the following on-line response has been extraordinary.

    “The feedback that I acquired, have been so professional educating,” she stated, calling them “heartwarming.”

    “It simply amazes me nonetheless how simply that one gesture, that one factor that somebody does, generally, impulsively, it simply has this enormous influence … and generally you do not even discover out till years later, but it surely’s simply these small moments, these small kindnesses that individuals do which means a lot.”

    As her retirement kicks off, Steelman hopes to journey — and later this yr, she’ll launch a e-book based mostly on her dissertation, titled, “sixteenth Century Shakespeare and twenty first Century College students.”

  • 2 questioned in Dan Ryan Expressway fatal shooting of Evergreen Park special ed teacher Denise Huguelet
    Special Education

    2 questioned in Dan Ryan Expressway fatal shooting of Evergreen Park special ed teacher Denise Huguelet

    Police were questioning two people Wednesday after a retired Evergreen Park special education teacher was shot and killed on the Dan Ryan Expressway.

    Denise M. Huguelet, 67, was shot about 10 p.m. Tuesday in the southbound lanes near 63rd Street, according to the Illinois State Police and the Cook County medical examiner’s office.

    She was struck by crossfire coming from two other cars as she headed home from a White Sox game with her husband, a relative told WBBM Newsradio. She had 11 grandchildren.

    A state trooper nearby heard the gunshots and chased a vehicle speeding from the area, state police said. With the help of a police helicopter, troopers arrested two people from the car and recovered a handgun. No charges had been filed as of Wednesday evening.

    Huguelet, of Orland Park, died of a gunshot wound to the back, an autopsy found.

    Huguelet was a special education teacher for 24 years at Central Middle School, according to Evergreen Park Elementary School District 124.

    “Her passion for students and her dedication to the community showed in all aspects of her work,” school officials said on Facebook. “Mrs. Huguelet’s nature with kids was kind, yet firm, to ensure that students were taught the independent skills they needed to be successful in their futures. She cared deeply about the academic needs of students, and the social and emotional well-being of every students’ needs.

    “An Evergreen Park native, she was a dear friend to many colleagues who will remember her character as pure, honest, fair and kind. She was an incredible woman whose memory will always be with us.”

    Her husband Michael Huguelet is a lawyer who once worked as a prosecutor for the village of Orland Park.

    “On behalf of myself and the village board, we express our sincere condolences to the Huguelet family,” Orland Park Mayor Keith Pekau said.

    The number of shootings on Chicago area expressways has more than tripled in the past three years. There have been 156 shootings on expressways so far this year, outpacing the 128 shootings seen in all of 2020, according to state police figures. There were 52 shootings in all of 2019.

    The Dan Ryan has seen seen 50 shootings so far this year, the most of any Chicago-area expressway, according to the state police. The Eisenhower Expressway has the second highest number of shootings at 34, followed by the Bishop Ford with 25.

    The Kennedy Expressway has had five shootings this year, and the Edens has had three.

    In February, the Illinois State Police were given $12.5 million to install high-definition surveillance cameras to deter and solve expressway shootings.

  • California Credit Union Offering Teacher Grants for Innovative Projects
    Coding and Robotics

    California Credit Union Offering Teacher Grants for Innovative Projects

    <p>Credit Union Encourages Los Angeles County Teachers to Apply for a Class Project Grant</p>

    LOS ANGELES, Sept. 1, 2021 /PRNewswire/ — California Credit Union encourages Los Angeles county teachers who have an innovative class project idea to apply for a credit union grant through its bi-annual Teacher Grant program.

    California Credit Union Logo (PRNewsfoto/California Credit Union)

    California Credit Union Logo (PRNewsfoto/California Credit Union)

    The California Credit Union grant program is available to full-time teachers in Los Angeles and Orange county, or credit union members teaching in California, looking to fund special learning opportunities for their students. The project should have clearly defined learning objectives tied to students’ academic needs, display creativity, and benefit a significant number of students. Ten California Credit Union grants of $500 each will be awarded to area teachers in October in the fall program.

    “Helping teachers provide an engaging, meaningful student experience is one way we’re supporting education in our communities. We know the challenges our teachers and students have experienced over the last year, and hope this grant will help make a special project come to life,” said California Credit Union President/CEO Steve O’Connell. “We encourage any teacher who has a class project idea that needs a little extra funding to apply for one of our grants.”

    Interested teachers can find more information and apply online at ccu.com/teachergrant. The application deadline is October 1, 2021.

    Since the creation of the program in 2012, California Credit Union has awarded $135,000 in teacher grants to benefit students across Southern California. Last year’s grant program funded a wide range of projects, including art expression programs focused on social change, anti-racism, diversity & inclusion, a cooking channel for special needs students, a mobile library, ASL instructional videos for families, coding & robotics programs, and a volunteer student reading program in assisted living facilities, among others.

    About California Credit Union
    California Credit Union is a federally insured, state chartered credit union founded in 1933 that serves public or private school employees, community members and businesses across California. With more than 165,000 members and assets of over $4 billion, California Credit Union has 25 branches throughout Los Angeles, Orange and San Diego counties. The credit union operates in San Diego County as North Island Credit Union, a division of California Credit Union. California Credit Union offers a full suite of consumer, business and investment products and services, including comprehensive consumer checking and loan options, personalized financial planning, business banking, and leading-edge online and mobile banking. V isit ccu.com for more information, or follow the credit union on Instagram® or Facebook® @CaliforniaCreditUnion.

    Cision

    Cision

    View original content to download multimedia:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/california-credit-union-offering-teacher-grants-for-innovative-projects-301366857.html

    SOURCE California Credit Union

  • Chicago special ed teacher killed after being caught in expressway shootout
    Special Education

    Chicago special ed teacher killed after being caught in expressway shootout

    A 67-year-old special education teacher was shot and killed when she got caught in the crossfire of a shootout on an expressway on Chicago’s South Side on Tuesday, according to police and reports.

    Denise Huguelet was shot around 10 p.m. on the Dan Ryan Expressway and was pronounced dead at a local hospital, WFLD-TV reported.

    Police said Huguelet was a passenger in an SUV driving in the southbound lanes of the roadway when she was shot.

    Police sources told WLS-TV that Huguelet was struck and another woman was grazed when they were caught between two cars shooting at each other.

    Illinois state troopers chased the vehicles at speeds reaching 120 mph before the suspects crashed into a trooper’s car and were taken into custody.

    Police have not released the names of the suspects and said charges are pending.

    Huguelet, who was on her way to dinner with her husband and son, had been a special education teacher at the Evergreen Park Elementary School for 24 years, the school district said in a Facebook post.

    “An Evergreen Park native, she was a dear friend to many colleagues who will remember her character as pure, honest, fair and kind,” the post said. “She was an incredible woman whose memory will always be with us.”

    The fatal shooting came one day after a 70-year-old grocery store worker, Yvonne Ruzich, was ambushed and killed by two men while sitting in her car outside her job at Baltimore Food and Liquor in Chicago.

    A spokesman for the Chicago Police Department said in an email to The Post on Wednesday that no new details have been released in that shooting and said cops are not connecting it to the new incident, “yet.”

  • Chicago expressway shooting kills special ed teacher, 67, heading home from White Sox game
    Special Education

    Chicago expressway shooting kills special ed teacher, 67, heading home from White Sox game

    Chicago’s crime wave claimed another victim Tuesday night: a 67-year-old special education teacher who was fatally struck by a bullet while traveling home from a White Sox game, according to reports.

    Denise Huguelet was pronounced dead at a hospital after suffering a gunshot wound to her back, FOX 32 of Chicago reported. 

    The highway shooting, around 10 p.m. on the Dan Ryan Expressway, was the 156th such crime in the city so far this year, surpassing the 128 total for all of 2020, and tripling the 52 total for all of 2019, the report said.

    Huguelet was riding home with her husband when suspects in two other vehicles started firing at one another, and Huguelet was killed by a crossfire shot, the Chicago Sun-Times reported.

    She and her husband had five children and 11 grandchildren, local media reported.

    CHICAGO OFFICER INJURED IN SHOOTING THAT KILLED ELLA FRENCH SPEAKS OUT FOR FIRST TIME

    Illinois State Police later apprehended two suspects in connection with the shooting and recovered a handgun, FOX 32 reported.

    State Police tracked down the suspects after a police helicopter spotted their vehicle speeding away from the site of the shooting, the station reported.

    Huguelet, a resident of Orland Park, taught for 24 years in nearby Evergreen Park, was a beloved and dedicated educator, Evergreen Park Elementary School District 124 wrote in a Facebook post.

    “Her passion for students and her dedication to the community showed in all aspects of her work,” the school district’s statement said.

    “Mrs. Huguelet’s nature with kids was kind, yet firm, to ensure that students were taught the independent skills they needed to be successful in their futures. She cared deeply about the academic needs of students, and the social and emotional well-being of every students’ needs,” the post continued.

    CHICAGO MOM KILLED IN DRIVE-BY SHOOTING IN FRONT OF HER KIDS DAY BEFORE SON’S 7TH BIRTHDAY: FAMILY

    “An Evergreen Park native, she was a dear friend to many colleagues who will remember her character as pure, honest, fair and kind. She was an incredible woman whose memory will always be with us.”

    “She was a dear friend to many colleagues who will remember her character as pure, honest, fair and kind. She was an incredible woman whose memory will always be with us.”

    — School district statement

    The Chicago White Sox, who played the Oakland Athletics on Tuesday night, also expressed condolences after learning about Huguelet’s death.

    “Our hearts are broken for the family of Denise Huguelet,” the team’s statement said. “She dedicated her career to making a difference in the lives of so many young students. The entire White Sox organization is deeply pained by the news of her passing and the loss of her warm, caring spirit that her friends, family and community remember well about Denise.”

    CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

    The Dan Ryan has seen 50 shootings this year, the Eisenhower Expressway 34, the Bishop Ford 25, the Kennedy five and the Edens three, according to FOX 32.

    Earlier this year, the Illinois State Police received $12.5 million to install high-definition cameras to help prevent expressway shootings and gather evidence to solve those cases that occur, the station reported.

  • First Person: I’m a teacher who embraces critical race theory
    Bilingual Education

    First Person: I’m a teacher who embraces critical race theory

    As a new teacher in Arizona 20 years ago, I found myself in the middle of a campaign against bilingual education.

    Arizona voters had recently passed Proposition 203 restricting bilingual education and English as a Second Language instruction, as it was called then, following a campaign by the conservative businessman Ron Unz. I was told by seasoned teachers only to speak English to students and to only send letters home in English. Any administrator could write us up for speaking another language, I was told, and I could even be fired.

    I worked with other teachers who saw the white supremacy in this initiative, though, who continued to use Spanish to communicate with students and their Spanish-speaking families. That experience taught me that there will always be someone trying to standardize teaching and issue misguided, top-down directives. But it’s my job to provide my students what they actually need — and I need to bring my whole self to the job to do that.

    A man with a short beard stands in front of a colorful mural.

    David Rosas
    Courtesy photo

    Last year, in my 21st year working in education and after eight years working in school leadership, I found myself back in the classroom, relearning those lessons. It was the fall of 2020, and the students in my mixed-age class of fourth and fifth graders had questions about the history of voting in the United States. How does voting work? What is the “electoral college”? Wait, Black people weren’t allowed to vote? Why did Black people have to march and pay taxes and take literacy tests just to vote?

    Mix in the Black Lives Matter movement, and our conversations and history lessons expanded to include discussions about current events, debates, and commitments to using their voices to resist discrimination. Students wrote about “Democracy Heroes,” a term that my co-teacher used to describe folks from various racial, ethnic, gender, and class groups who have fought against oppression.

    Virtual learning added more difficulty. When I changed to a mixed-age kindergarten and first grade class, It became clear that picking a picture book that would spark curiosity in a 5-year-old was key to keeping that child’s interest on Zoom. Having that student’s race reflected in the text was one way to do that. And writing? There is no way anyone ages 5-10 will write if they are not interested in the content — and that’s true when they’re getting regular, in-person instruction. Teaching and learning remotely meant that writing prompts had to include our students’ lives and realities.

    That is why critical race theory is not something I will shy away from, even as lawmakers across half of our country ban certain kinds of discussions of race and racism.

    Using texts that include our students’ lives and realities centers their experiences as raced people, a tenet of critical race theory. By engaging in research about “Democracy Heroes” and using picture books that focus on characters of color, Whiteness is decentered — another educational tenet of critical race theory. Finally, we all thought of how to sustain our cultures and our integrity through storytelling — another educational tenet of critical race theory. Critical race theory is interwoven in all that I do.

    It happens that New York City parents are OK with that. I know this because I am also a doctoral student and member of the Urban Education Research Collective at the CUNY Graduate Center. Our project focused on listening to New York City parents voice their concerns and share their perspectives about schooling during the COVID-19 pandemic and the country’s increased focus on racial justice. They told us that more parent and community engagement is needed to shape school policies; that their children’s social-emotional and mental health deserves more attention; and that New York City schools should use a more anti-racist and inclusive curriculum.

    Teachers need the freedom to do what we have been charged to do – to educate. As we get deeper into the 21st century, we have to leave the tools of and perceived “normalcy” of White supremacy behind us, too.

    To do my job last year, I needed an environment that let me use all of my tools to figure out how to teach reading, writing, and math, and hold space for all of the kids’ questions. I needed space to be a teacher who was racially literate and racially radical, who could both answer students’ questions about the world we live in now and help them imagine a world where racism does not shape their life opportunities.

    I had that space, but not all educators do. Please, just let us all educate — and let us be our whole selves.

    David R. Rosas is a first-generation, bilingual, queer-identified, Indigenous, Native New Yorker from Hell’s Kitchen, pre-gentrification, and is now an assistant principal at the Castle Bridge School in Washington Heights. David has been an educator for 21 years and has worked as a teacher in grades K-7, an instructional coach, assistant principal, and principal in elementary schools. Additionally, he advises pre-service school leaders at Bank Street College of Education and Teachers College, Columbia University.

  • Savannah teacher charged with 1st degree cruelty to children
    Special Education

    Savannah teacher charged with 1st degree cruelty to children

    Above video: Your Tuesday headlinesCLICK HERE FOR UPDATES ON THE STORYA Savannah special education teacher at Godley Station is facing a charge of 1st degree cruelty to children.Elizabeth Louise Board turned herself in to authorities on August 16, according to the Savannah-Chatham County Public School System.SCCPSS released the following statement:”A Godley Station K8 teacher, Elizabeth Board, has been removed from her teaching assignment and reassigned to an alternative site location having no contact with students. This action took place immediately after receiving allegations of inappropriate behavior. Campus Police conducted an investigation into the allegations and referred the charges to the Chatham County District Attorney’s Office. The investigation remains active.On Monday, August 16, 2021, Ms. Board turned herself in to authorities after being charged with Cruelty to Children in the First Degree. SCCPSS is committed to ensuring a quality, safe learning environment and will continue to work with authorities in this ongoing matter. The safety of our students is our first priority.As this is a personnel matter, SCCPSS will have no further comment on this case.”What is specifically alleged to have happened has not been released. An incident report from SCCPSS police indicates authorities were notified on August 10 by the school principal and that there were several witnesses.This is a developing story. Check back for updates.

    Above video: Your Tuesday headlines

    CLICK HERE FOR UPDATES ON THE STORY

    A Savannah special education teacher at Godley Station is facing a charge of 1st degree cruelty to children.

    elizabeth&#x20;board

    Chatham County Detention Center

    Elizabeth Louise Board turned herself in to authorities on August 16, according to the Savannah-Chatham County Public School System.

    SCCPSS released the following statement:

    “A Godley Station K8 teacher, Elizabeth Board, has been removed from her teaching assignment and reassigned to an alternative site location having no contact with students. This action took place immediately after receiving allegations of inappropriate behavior. Campus Police conducted an investigation into the allegations and referred the charges to the Chatham County District Attorney’s Office. The investigation remains active.

    On Monday, August 16, 2021, Ms. Board turned herself in to authorities after being charged with Cruelty to Children in the First Degree.

    SCCPSS is committed to ensuring a quality, safe learning environment and will continue to work with authorities in this ongoing matter. The safety of our students is our first priority.

    As this is a personnel matter, SCCPSS will have no further comment on this case.”

    What is specifically alleged to have happened has not been released. An incident report from SCCPSS police indicates authorities were notified on August 10 by the school principal and that there were several witnesses.

    This is a developing story. Check back for updates.